Archive for the News Category

French Bible from the Reformation

May 18, 2017 with 1 Comment and Posted in News by

This was one of the Bibles that the ‘Poor of Lyon’ (another name for the Waldensians) translated from Latin into French. It dates to 1580.

The Casa Valdese

May 18, 2017 with No Comments and Posted in News by

Today we are in Waldensian Country learning about the early Reformation. The Casa Valdese was and still is used as a meeting place for Waldensian leaders.

Where Michael Servetus was Condemned

May 16, 2017 with No Comments and Posted in News by

This is the City Hall of Geneva, where the Unitarian Michael Servetus was sentenced to death. He came to Geneva after escaping prison, where he was being held for heresy. Two Catholic countries were trying to have him executed. Calvin is often censured for burning him at the stake, but in actuality he thought it was a cruel form of execution, and the decision was not made by him.

The Reformation City of Geneva

May 16, 2017 with No Comments and Posted in News by

Today we visited Geneva – which was a city of refuge in the Alps, to many Protestants fleeing persecution in the 16th century. It was also a center of missionary activity. Thousands were trained here and sent out all over the world.

Following Along on the Reformation 500 Tour!

May 16, 2017 with No Comments and Posted in News by

Stay tuned over the next two weeks as we’re on a tour/film shoot in Europe. We’ll post pictures and stories along the way, from Geneva, Rome, Wittenburg, and many places in between.

Persecuting the Persecuted: How Voice of the Martyrs Funded Abuse of Nigerian Orphans

April 13, 2017 with No Comments and Posted in News by

Although this is outside the normal scope of Discerning History, we wanted to make our readers aware of this situation as it is one in which those behind Discerning History are deeply involved.

Voice of the Martyrs is a ministry that purports to help Christian victims of persecution. However, it has been discovered that their work in Nigeria was in a tragic state – orphans were being abused and mistreated, financial fraud was rampant, and those who were trying to spread the word were being removed. When this was reported to the office in the United States, they seemed more concerned with covering up a scandal than ensuring that justice was done.

Please visit this web page to watch a video that describes the situation, sign the petition, and spread the word.

Thank you.

A Royal Palace in North Carolina

December 3, 2016 with No Comments and Posted in News by

There’s a remnant of royal splendor left in costal North Carolina – Tryon Palace, a reconstruction of the palace built for the royal governor and finished in 1770. This was an expensive building for the colony, and many people were upset by the taxes that were raised to fund it. These tensions led to the War of the Regulation in 1770, and ultimately the American War for Independence. 

The People of Great Smoky Mountains National Park

October 28, 2016 with No Comments and Posted in News by

Although today, Great Smoky Mountains National Park is an uninhabited wilderness, when the land was being purchased in the 1920s and 1930s, there were people who lived and worked in the area. Evidence of their presence can be found in bald mountains used to graze cattle, and cabins like this one, in Cades Cove. Some of the inhabitants lived in the park until the 1960s.

Crossing the Proclamation Line

October 12, 2016 with No Comments and Posted in News by

In 1763 the British set a line along the Appalacian Mountains, to the Wes of which was Indian territory into which no settlers would allowed to cross. This did not sit well with American frontiers men, and many illegally entered through mountain passes like this one. This was one of many grievances against the British, and many of those frontiersmen made great soldiers for the Patriot cause.

South Carolina Tour Video

October 4, 2016 with No Comments and Posted in News by

You may enjoy this fun glimpse into this years tour of South Carolina. Stay tuned for our plans for 2017!

How Charles Pinckney Honored His Father

September 10, 2016 with No Comments and Posted in News, War for Independence by

If you visit the home of Charles Pinckney, you will find no monument commemorating his achievements as signer of the Constitution and governor of South Carolina. But in he peaceful grounds of his country estate you may find a stone he raised in tribute to his own father – also Charles Pinckney – three years after his death. On it, he inscribed the words of Thomas Gray, including the following:
What is grandeur, what is power?
Heavier toil, superior pain!
What the bright reward we gain?
The grateful mem’ry of the good.

Governor Aiken’s Bookcases 

September 10, 2016 with No Comments and Posted in Civil War, News by

Bookcases in the the library of Aiken, the 19th century governor of South Carolina.